Skoll Foundation

 

Videos

New Video from Myanmar Shows How a $13 Pump Can Triple Farmers’ Incomes

March 27, 2015 by
 
 

Until two years ago, Myanmar (Burma) was very isolated with no access to what most farmers around the world had, such as credit, proper equipment and roads to get goods to market. In this Skoll Foundation visit to Myanmar, Proximity Designs co-founders Jim Taylor and Debbie Aung Din show how their organization has helped cause a 15 percent increase in rice yield. Before Proximity Designs, farmers spent up to eight hours a day carrying buckets of water to irrigate their fields. Now, with a low-cost pump operated by feet, they can water their crops in two hours, and make up to triple their previous income.

Watch and get a glimpse of the Proximity pumps in action; see farmers getting hands-on training, and finally, meet a farmer who can’t stop smiling as he shows off his new tractor. It’s a tractor he can afford because of Proximity’s products and services.

 

See Why Saving the Dead Sea is So Important in This CNN Segment Featuring Ecopeace Middle East

March 26, 2015 by
 
 

CNN Journalist Bill Weir travelled to the Middle East and shows us stunning images of the Dead Sea in this new “The Wonder List” segment, called “The Dead Sea is Dying.” He interviews EcoPeace Middle East co-founder Gidon Bromberg extensively.

“I went there thinking this might be a climate change story,” Weir said, “But it turns out it’s really a people story…and water management.”

In one part, Bromberg shows him an area where rehabilitation is taking place, and later tells him a nursery was built there to protect the wildlife. “This is by Middle East standards, a miracle,” Bromberg said, showing him a dam.

In other parts of the show, the loss of water is striking.

Watch the entire segment: http://www.cnn.com/videos/world/2015/03/25/wonder-list-skype-dead-sea-orig.cnn

 

 

“Stand with Sanju” is a Top 5 Winner in the GlobalGiving Video Contest

March 9, 2015 by
 
 

In the fall, we told you about “Stand with Sanju,” a three-minute video which depicts the real journey of Sanju, a girl who went from being a carpet-factory slave to the first person in her family to attend school. Part of the Sundance Institute | Skoll Stories of Change initiative, the film was just chosen as a Top Five in the 2015 GlobalGiving Video Contest. “We had more than 60 amazing video submissions and a very tough job of choosing just a handful of winners,” GlobalGiving said on their blog.

Watch “Stand with Sanju” above, and learn more about the contest here.

 

“Map Your World” for Climate, Typhoon Haiyan and Affordable Internet

February 5, 2015 by
 
 

You may remember us writing about “Map Your World,” which emerged as a project of our Stories of Change film “Revolutionary Optimists.” We love what they’ve been able to accomplish using this web-based platform to empower young people. Some recent projects:

  • In 2014 Map Your World helped record the stories and data of over 1 milllion youth in the Philippines helping to restore their country in the aftermath of Typhoon Haian in partnership with Gawad Kalinga.
  • Sixth graders in a D.C. neighborhood leveraged data and story to stand up for their right to affordable internet access – and won! This was part of a partnership with the UC Berkeley Center for Cities + Schools Y-Plan Project. 
  • And in a year marked by devastating climate news, youth in Nashville mapped urban heat islands and ran a campaign to get their communities to change their energy consumption.

Learn more: http://mapyourworld.org/#/campaigns

 

Canada Announces $1M Investment to Improve Mental Health in African Nations

January 27, 2015 by
 
 

Today we’re sharing an official announcement about an investment in BasicNeeds, its founder Chris Underhill’s new blog and his new interview from Davos:

Grand Challenges Canada funds innovative social franchising of BasicNeeds’ Mental Health and Development Model

Toronto, Canada – Grand Challenges Canada today announced an investment in an innovative social franchise approach to scale up the treatment and support of mental illness in resource- poor countries. The approach has been developed by international mental health and development NGO BasicNeeds, to ensure their award-winning model for those living with mental illness reaches as many people in need as possible.

Today nearly 75% of the 450 million people worldwide with mental illness and epilepsy live in the developing world, and 85% of these people have no access to treatment. The size of the problem is huge, with depression alone projected to be the leading global burden of disease by 2030. This urgent and currently unmet need for better treatment and expanded access to care for those living with mental disorders in resource poor settings is what the ‘BasicNeeds Model’ seeks to address.

BasicNeeds’ unique approach works with existing health and community systems, and staff to provide community based mental health treatment through outreach clinics, mental health camps and regular check-ups. However, treatment alone is not enough for sustained improvements to mental health, which is why the Model also increases an individual’s access to emotional and practical support through self-help groups, improves their capacity to find meaningful occupation and employment, and ultimately works to changes health systems and policy for the better.

Through the implementation of its Model across 12 countries, BasicNeeds has presented strong evidence that its approach generates sustainable impact. It has enabled 86% of people with mental health problems in the communities they serve to access treatment (compared to 49% baseline), of which 73% reported reduced symptoms. The positive outcomes of reported reduced symptoms are underpinned by a reduction in mortality. Over the last 14 years, the lives of more than 600,000 beneficiaries have been improved. While this is a sizable number, it is only a drop in the ocean, when we consider the vast treatment gap.

The new investment announced today will enable organisations in Ghana, Kenya and Nigeria to deliver the BasicNeeds Model for Mental Health and Development themselves, under a social franchise agreement, with ongoing training and assistance from BasicNeeds International. Empowering and supporting in-country organisations to take on the independent delivery of the BasicNeeds Model will expand its reach in a sustainable and cost effective manner, whilst ensuring that quality remains central to the delivery and BasicNeeds brand. Over 3 years the funding is projected to help 10,000 people.

Simultaneously, BasicNeeds Ghana will initiate scale-up through the direct implementation of the Model in new regions in Ghana. To support this process, researchers at the University of Ghana will be rigorously testing the Model’s cost utility as compared to standard approaches to mental health treatment provided by the Ghana public health system. This will involve measuring costs against economic welfare, functional capacity and Quality Adjusted Life Years gained.

Grand Challenges Canada is investing $1 million CAD, bringing the total funding to $2 million CAD from investments made by the UK’s Department for International Development (DFID), the Skoll Foundation, Caritas Nyeri, the Ministry of Health in Osogbo Osun State, Nigeria, and the Kenyan and Ghanaian governments.

“We are absolutely delighted to receive this generous investment from Grand Challenges Canada to improve the lives of thousands of people suffering from mental illness in Africa. We are hugely grateful for this support. This investment in our social franchise programme will give us the opportunity to build the capacity of organisations in Ghana, Kenya and Nigeria to effectively implement our holistic model and make a difference to many more lives,” said Chris Underhill, Founder President of BasicNeeds.

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In other BasicNeeds news, Underhill  just wrote an article for Mental Health Innovation Network called “Breaking Through Depression: What is the best way to reach people suffering from depression in resource-poor settings?” Here’s an excerpt:

“Despite the obvious size of the problem, to my surprise I have found that tackling depression is sometimes portrayed as a luxury in both richer and poorer nations, something to aspire to when basic standards of living, and basic levels of physical health, are met. The reality, however, is that without good mental health, all other areas of life unravel. Depression prevents people from studying or working and impairs their relationships with others. It can also damage physical health, as an individual’s ability to look after themselves is reduced. In resource-poor settings, sufferers find their social standing is decimated as they become unable to contribute economically to their family, and their unusual behaviour makes them feared and rejected by their community.”

Read the rest: http://mhinnovation.net/blog/2015/jan/22/breaking-through-depression-what-best-way-reach-people-suffering-depression#.VMctZVb68ds

 

Stella Artois and Water.org Launch “Buy a Lady a Drink” to Help Stop Women’s Journeys to Collect Water in the Developing World

January 22, 2015 by
 
 


Limited-edition Chalices help support the cause: One Chalice provides five years of clean water to one person in the developing world

 (NEW YORK, NY – January 22, 2015) – Today, with the support of Water.org and its co-founders Matt Damon and Gary White, Stella Artois launched its first global social impact campaign ‘Buy a Lady a Drink’ to drive awareness of the global water crisis and help provide solutions. Every day, women around the world spend a combined 200 million hours collecting clean water for their families. ‘Buy a Lady a Drink’ aims to help put a stop to these water-collecting journeys, so women can start new journeys of their own.

Stella Artois has made a donation of $1.2 million to Water.org and is now inviting consumers to join the cause by purchasing limited-edition Chalices. One Chalice will help Water.org provide five years of clean water to one person in the developing world. In the U.S., consumers can purchase one of the 20,000 exclusive Chalices for $12 at Amazon.com; all proceeds from sales of the Chalices will be donated to Water.org. Beyond purchasing a Chalice, consumers will also be able to learn more about the Stella Artois ‘Buy a Lady a Drink’ campaign, the partnership with Water.org and stories of women directly impacted by the global water crisis by visiting http://www.BuyALadyADrink.com.

“We’re honored to be joining forces with this premier global brand that has stepped up to support Water.org and help us raise awareness of the water crisis,” said Gary White, co-founder of Water.org.

“Awareness is as important as fundraising,” said Water.org co-founder Matt Damon. “We want people to understand the issue in all its complexity.”

read more

 

Landesa on Why Land Rights Should Be in Post-2015 Goals

January 16, 2015 by
 
 

As UN member states begin their discussions on the post 2015 sustainable development framework on January 19th, Landesa and its partners want to continue efforts to ensure that land rights for women and men is explicitly included in the post 2015 development goals, targets, and indicators.

This video makes the case for why it is vital to retain secure land rights for women and men under three key goals: poverty, nutrition, and gender equality. Learn more: http://landpost2015.landesa.org

 

New Video on Child Marriage from Kenya: Convincing Men that Ending Child Marriage is their Responsibility

January 2, 2015 by
 
 

Happy New Year!

As the Christian Science Monitor shines a spotlight on child marriage in its new article, “Too young to be a bride: More countries aim to curb child marriage,” we would like to share a video following Wanjala Wafula, a women’s rights activist from Kenya, in his day-to-day work. He seeks to convince men that ending child marriage is not just a necessity: it is their responsibility. The film explores the complex factors that perpetuate child marriage and how men can take a more active role in upholding the rights of girls.

 

 

Girls Not Brides’ New Film on Ending Child Marriage in Zambia

December 9, 2014 by
 
 

We’re happy to share Girls Not Brides’ new film, which tells the story of Mirriam, a 17 year-old girl from rural Zambia with big dreams and big ambitions. Where Mirriam lives, however, child marriage is all too common: two in every five girls are married before they are 18.

Together: Ending Child Marriage in Zambia is a short documentary that asks what can be done to enable girls like Mirriam to avoid child marriage and fulfil their potential?
It tells the story of partnership, of how civil society activists, girls, traditional leaders, and the government are coming together to make sure that no girl is married as a child. It also considers how, if we can build momentum in a country where rates of early marriage are among the highest in the world, then perhaps we can pave the way for change not only in Zambia but far beyond.

 

 

Nelson Mandela Remembered: A New Film from The Elders

December 5, 2014 by
 
 

Today is the first anniversary of the passing of Nelson Mandela. The Elders have produced a new film which you can view above. In it, Kofi Annan, Jimmy Carter and fellow Elders talk about what Nelson Mandela was like to know as a person, his impact and the legacy that he left behind.

Don’t miss our past blogs: http://www.skollfoundation.org/tag/nelson-mandela/

 

Two Riders for Health Motorcycle Couriers Featured on BBC World News

November 14, 2014 by
 
 

A new BBC World News story follows two Riders for Health motorcycle drivers in Malawi: Medical couriers who pick up blood and urine samples and transport it to the nearest labs. The piece showed the pride Madalitso and Kufa have in their work, and the sometimes lifesaving power their job has. Nicole Buono of the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation (EGPAF) was also interviewed: “Before Riders for Health, we weren’t getting the results back; it was taking a long time. That’s time in a child’s life that they could die.”

Here’s more about it from Riders:

In Malawi, Riders for Health’s sample couriers are helping organisations to transform the quality and speed of medical testing they are able to provide for people in some of the most remote places. A new partnership between EGPAF and Riders for Health will expedite the delivery of laboratory samples and HIV-related test results to health facilities in two districts of the Northern and Central Zones of Malawi.

Riders’ sample couriers will enable EGPAF to provide more women with lifesaving care and treatment while also increasing local capacity to build lasting health systems that will create an AIDS-free generation. To learn more about this new partnership, click here.

In total, Riders for Health has 34 sample couriers across Malawi funded by Howard University Technical Assistance Project, Center for Disease Control/PEPFAR, TB Care II, Clinton Health Access Initiative (CHAI) and the Swedish Postcode Lottery .

Each sample courier has a motorcycle that they are trained to ride safely and maintain on a daily basis. Riders for Health also employs skilled local technicians who provide monthly services on the bikes, so they never break down.

Listen above.

 

 

Social Progress Index at TEDGlobal 2014

November 11, 2014 by
 
 

“GDP has defined and shaped our lives for the last 80 years,” says Michael Green in a new TED talk about the Social Progress Index, but “it’s not a measure of our wellbeing and it shouldn’t be a guide to all decision making.”

The Social Progress Imperative CEO spoke at TEDGlobal in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, last month. Watch his captivating talk: “What the Social Progress Index can reveal about your country“.

 

Landesa News: A New Study on Chinese Farmers’ Rights, Tanzania’s New Constitution and More

November 7, 2014 by
 
 

Today we’re sharing five pieces of land rights news from Landesa:

In a new BigThink 3-minute video, Landesa CEO Tim Hanstad says women are doing the bulk of the agricultural labor, but locked out of land ownership. Hear more about how and why this should change above.

RRI and Landesa released a new study on paper giant’s APP operations in China, which they say largely violated Chinese law and farmer’s rights to informed consent and proper compensation.

The Guardian ran a Landesa and ActionAid op-ed about Tanzania’s new constitution, which grants women unprecedented rights and protections and the right to own and inherit land. Find out why Tanzania’s female lawmakers erupted into cheers in parliament.

The South China Morning Post includes an op-ed from Tim Hanstad on the one group of farmers who may not benefit from Beijing’s historic efforts to create a the country’s first national land registry and improve land tenure security for rural women. As it stands, women’s names are not being included in the land registries in a majority of provinces — severely undermining women’s tenure security.

Also, Landesa Africa program director Jennifer Duncan was quoted in a Wall Street Journal article. Jennifer pointed out the inherent risks in a plan to lease more than 200,000 acres of farmland in Congo.

 

WATCH: Raymond Guthrie’s Water Panel

November 5, 2014 by
 
 

Skoll Foundation Principal Raymond Guthrie, who works on our Innovation Investment team, just spoke on the Philanthropist and Funder Panel at the 2014 Water for Food Global Conference. He spoke alongside David Bergvinson of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

In response to a question, “What areas of water are you looking at investing in and where do you see innovative database solutions?”

Raymond answered, “Our foundation…doesn’t take a sector or a region and look for portfolio.

Our investments stem from our social entrepreneurs. I will give two social entrepreneurs as examples.

Water for People…has an innovation called FLOW that can monitor real-time water points and to ensure water is being served sustainably adn cleanly. They cover 2 million people and 7,000 water points now using mobile technology and geomapping. Another example is One Acre Fund, which works for subsistence farmers in primarily east Africa and partner with governments… and that’s driven by their own data. They spent years finding out what works to… ultimately get the farmers a higher income.”

Watch the rest of the panel above, and learn more about Raymond: http://www.skollfoundation.org/meet-the-skoll-foundation-raymond-guthrie/

 

Ann Cotton Wins WISE Prize for Education

November 4, 2014 by
 
 

Congratulations on this major honor, Ann Cotton!

Here’s the announcement from Camfed:

Ann Cotton’s work to support community-owned, integrated education programs for girls and young women in rural Africa was today recognized with the WISE Prize for Education

“I am honored to join education innovators like Vicky Colbert, Founder of Escuela Nueva in Colombia, Dr. Madhav Chavan, co-Founder of Pratham in India, and Sir Fazle Hasan Abed, Founder of BRAC in Bangladesh, as the fourth WISE Laureate,” says Ann Cotton.

Education Innovation Reaching the Most Marginalized Communities

The World Innovation Summit for Education (WISE) was established to place innovation in education at the forefront of the global agenda. Since its inception, the WISE Prize has been awarded to individuals whose education programs reach the most marginalized communities. read more

 

GoodWeave Founder Wins Nobel Peace Prize

October 10, 2014 by
 
 

From the cocoa fields of Côte d’Ivoire to the carpet sheds of Uttar Pradesh, there are 168 million children around the world who toil in obscurity.  Today, their plight took center stage.  This morning, the Norwegian Nobel Committee awarded the 2014 peace prize to Kailash Satyarthi and Malala Yousafzai, two individuals who have staked their lives on the belief that children – regardless of gender, geography, faith, caste or societal circumstance – belong in classrooms.

In the announcement from Oslo, committee chairman Thorbjorn Jagland said: “Showing great personal courage, Kailash Satyarthi, maintaining Gandhi’s tradition, has headed various forms of protests and demonstrations, all peaceful, focusing on the grave exploitation of children for financial gain.”

In the 1980s, once on an engineering career track, Kailash Satyarthi began rescuing children from bondage.  As chairman of the South Asian Coalition on Child Servitude, he fought against child slavery one factory at a time, one child at a time.  He conducted rescue raids and liberated children who were enduring extreme violence, some brutally beaten if they ever tried to escape.

Following one such raid, Satyarthi personally returned a trafficked boy to his home village. When he went to board a train home, Satyarthi saw dozens and dozens of children destined for the looms in the hands of middlemen.  Arrested for causing a disturbance at the station, Satyarthi suddenly realized that this situation required a larger solution.

“Something else had to be done. I thought, ‘Consumers have to be educated!’” Satyarthi said in a 2013 interview.  This realization was for him a turning point and for the child labor movement, a profound shift in thinking and strategy.  In addition to exposing the ugly truth behind beautiful rugs, Satyarthi set out to establish a certification system that would incentivize manufacturers to stop exploiting children as well as guide consumer purchases.  Thus the RugMark label (now GoodWeave) was born. The first carpets with that certification were exported from India in 1995.

Today, GoodWeave works in the top consumer capitals of the world and in the key rug-producing areas across Asia, expanding most recently to Afghanistan.  Their programs in weaving villages near Kabul, Mazar and soon Herat are reaching girls, many of whom resemble Malala.  And in the two decades since Satyarthi’s jail cell a-ha moment, the organization has gone on to reduce the number of “carpet kids” in the region by two-thirds.

The head of GoodWeave International, Nina Smith upon hearing the news, said: “So many of us were motivated to join this struggle to protect the lives of vulnerable children because of him.  This is an incredible moment for Kailash, for GoodWeave, for the children who have been forced to sacrifice their youth and their education for the benefit of business, and for the 130+ carpet importers and retailers who have taken a stand.”

GoodWeave is now preparing to finish the work that Satyarthi began and reach the 250,000 children left on looms through their “Stand with Sanju” campaign.  It is inspired by the real life story of a Nepalese girl – not unlike Malala – who went from carpet loom to classroom.

As Kailash looks back on his journey, he remains optimistic that the model can be used in other industries from chocolate to mining. “At the time we launched the certification, nobody had heard the phrases, ‘corporate responsibility,’ or ‘corporate accountability.’ But we have given voice to many initiatives in the world. And some of the basic ingredients of GoodWeave now are being used as great lessons by others. In the end, we can change the world in this way.”

 

Gary White and Matt Damon’s Talk at Clinton Global Initiative Annual Meeting

September 25, 2014 by
 
 

The press has been buzzing about Water.org‘s plenary at the Clinton Global Initiative Annual Meeting (CGI) this week, so we wanted to share some news coverage. Watch the organization’s co-founders, Matt Damon and Gary White, on stage above, at 53 minutes after the video begins.

Here’s an excerpt of the plenary coverage from LiveScience:

Damon told the audience that every 20 seconds, a child under the age of five dies from a preventable waterborne disease. Water, sanitation and hygiene problems kill more than 3.4 million people each year, and 99 percent of these cases occur in the developing world, according to Water.org.

And the Huffington Post:

Damon, together with fellow Water.org co-founder Gary White, explained how a lack of potable water and sanitation leads to fatal illnesses, but is also just as much of a women’s issue, since women and girls are often assaulted while relieving themselves in public. And while the pair agrees that there will never be “enough charity” to solve the water crisis, they remain optimistic about their progress, pointing specifically to the critical role microloans play.

The Boston Globe focused on a fun moment:

Cambridge-bred clean water advocate Matt Damon spoke Tuesday at the Clinton Global Initiative in New York. The Water.org cofounder talked about his mission to get clean and safe water to all, and did a pretty solid impression of former President Bill Clinton while onstage.

And don’t miss Gary White’s recent op-ed in The Guardian, called “We can solve the water sanitation crisis, but we need your help.”

 

Camfed and Room to Read Part of Clinton Global Initiative Commitment to Reach 14 Million Girls

September 24, 2014 by
 
 

One of the most exciting announcements at today’s Clinton Global Initiative (CGI) Annual Meeting was by Former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, Chelsea Clinton and Julia Gillard, who announced a collaboration of more than 30 groups to improve learning and leadership opportunities for young women and girls. Two of these organizations are Skoll Awardees Room to Read and Camfed.

This collective effort, CHARGE – Collaborative for Harnessing Ambition and Resources for Girls’ Education – has committed over $600 million dollars to reach 14 million girls over five years.  Camfed will spend $100 million to help marginalized girls in sub-Saharan Africa complete secondary school and transition to secure livelihoods. And Room to Read will invest $12 million to serve an additional 15,000 girls in nine countries to ensure that girls transition to secondary school and then from school to the workforce or higher education.

Here’s more, from Camfed’s announcement:

Camfed today announced our goal to support one million girls through their secondary school education and into successful, secure livelihoods.

“Our goal is to reach marginalized and excluded girls in rural communities in sub Saharan Africa and support them to complete a full cycle of secondary education,” said Lucy Lake, CEO of Camfed. “Our commitment to these students doesn’t end with graduation. We will work with them and support them to move forward from school into economic independence and positions of leadership. We are excited to sign up for this Commitment,” said Lake. “This is an ambitious undertaking that will multiply opportunities for girls and young women in rural areas of Africa.”

In addition to Camfed’s own announcement, Pearson, in partnership with Camfed, committed to offering Business and Technology Education Council (BTEC) qualifications to 5,000 Camfed Learner Guides in Ghana, Tanzania and Zimbabwe. The 5,000 Learner Guides are young women school graduates who will return to school to teach and guide more than 150,000 girls to improve their attendance, retention and education in secondary school. Through the BTEC, a transferable vocational qualification, Learner Guides will acquire an important, internationally benchmarked qualification that provides a stepping stone into formal higher education and teacher training.

 

Medic Mobile’s New Film: Who Are Community Health Workers?

September 23, 2014 by
 
 
Medic Mobile has just released a new film. Here’s what they say about it (watch it above!)
“With UN Week upon us, there’s a beautiful chance to turn the mainstream conversation toward the health and wellbeing of the global community. Luckily the global community has health advocates at the neighborhood-level who are radically changing how people access healthcare. Community health workers are local members trained to provide basic, life-saving health services in some of the hardest-to-reach places. Their efforts are especially important in areas where people aren’t likely to see a doctor in their lifetime.
The World Health Organization estimates there are over 1.3 million community health workers worldwide, including the United States, but their work is largely uncredited. From ensuring that every child receives their immunizations, to increasing the use of bed nets to prevent malaria, community health workers are improving the statistics in underserved communities. Malawi in particular has made tremendous progress in lowering child mortality, cutting under-5 deaths by 71% due in a large part to their robust health worker program based on a study by UNICEF. Many health workers are now on the front-lines battling the Ebola outbreak and can be at risk of sickness and violence. This video made by the Skoll foundation is a look at the lives of three community health workers in Kenya where Medic Mobile partnered with Kilifi Kids and the Ministry of Health to train 450 community health workers to register women as soon as they become pregnant to ensure regular antenatal care visits. This is a small snapshot of a larger group of amazing people that take on the care of their communities every day. Please share their story.”

 

 

Half the Sky, and “Wish You Happy Forever” on PBS NewsHour

September 3, 2014 by
 
 

Jenny Bowen, founder of Half the Sky and author of “Wish You Happy Forever: What China’s Orphans Taught me About Moving Mountains” were featured on PBS NewsHour last night. “Sixteen years later, Jenny Bowen heads a group called the Half the Sky Foundation that’s helping transform the way orphans are cared for across China, with the blessings of and often in partnership with the government…The group has so far trained 12,000 teachers and nannies in 27 provinces. We visited in the northeastern city of Shenyang,” reporter Fred de Sam Lazaro said.

The 9-minute segment covered Jenny’s own adopted children from China, the conditions that prompted her to start Half the Sky, and the challenges she faced. de Sam Lazaro interviewed the woman who worked with Jenny in the early days, and a Chinese husband-and-wife team who are currently Half the Sky caregivers. Part of the report was from one of Half the Sky’s Children’s Centers, where we met thriving young children and one of their caregivers.

The story also took us inside a section of a center for “pretty severe special-needs” children, where we met a blind 4-year-old with cancer. It ended with a poignant quote from one of Jenny’s daughters, 18-year-old Maya:

“I did a paper and we could — at school, and it was a research paper, and we could do it on anything, so I chose my mom, because I thought that would be an easy topic. But then, when I started researching and learning everything she did, I was like, wow, like, this goes way farther than I thought. She has, like, a much bigger influence than I ever thought.”

Watch the segment above, and read more from Jenny here: http://skollworldforum.org/contributor/jenny-bowen/ and here: http://www.skollfoundation.org/category/news/?ent=636

 
 

© 2015 Skoll Foundation.